my vanishing country npr

You give birth to that child only for the first time your husband can see that child is on the prison yard. I mean, in the book, you write about a speech you gave subsequently. Sacramento, CA 95826-2625. SELLERS: I am very, very hopeful. You said, it remains the most important day of my life. This happened in 1968. Bakari Sellers, welcome. MARTIN: That is lawyer and political analyst Bakari Sellers. Copyright 2020 NPR. Imagine being a black woman in this country, and your husband goes to prison because of an injustice, and you're carrying their first - your first child. And that's why I tried to make sure that I live with intentionality and purpose - so we can create what you just outlined in your question - a more perfect union. I mean, honestly, your title doesn't suggest so. His memoir, "My Vanishing Country," is out now. You’ve found a like-minded tribe that cherishes what a free press stands for. And so in "My Vanishing Country," I literally talk about not just that incident but how it's informed my perspective being a child of the movement and also outline my trauma and my pain of living with that and carrying that burden and carrying that legacy all the way through the Charleston massacre, where my good friend Clementa Pinckney was gunned down after worshipping on Wednesday night at Bible study. SELLERS: No, thank you for allowing me to lend my voice to this very, very important discussion. You probably know attorney Bakari Sellers as a TV news analyst and rising political leader. I say all of that to say that the systemic conditions in this country lead to black folk having these comorbidities and these preventable diseases. SELLERS: It's an amazing story of tragedy and injustice. And I just - I found it so remarkable because I think that in recent years, we've come to acknowledge and even in some quarters celebrate the heroism of people who did work and fight so hard to desegregate the bowling alleys, to create opportunities for the entire country, to, you know, help this country live up to its stated ideals. My father's path and my own are woven together over the same bloody ground. Part memoir, part historical and cultural analysis, My Vanishing Country is an eye-opening journey through the South's past, present, and future. Bakari Sellers, thank you so much for speaking with us. You called it "My Vanishing Country" - the title of your memoir. I mean, how do you - do you see these two connected in some way? At the age of 22, he was the youngest elected state lawmaker in the country, a race he started preparing for while still in college. SELLERS: No, thank you for allowing me to lend my voice to this very, very important discussion. This happened in 1968. SELLERS: We need justice in this country. They were all found not guilty. They killed three young men, none of them over the age of 19. And so I want people to begin to talk about tangible solutions to improve the plight. Why is that? And so I want people to begin to talk about tangible solutions to improve the plight. I mean, in the book, you write about a speech you gave subsequently. In a new memoir, Bakari Sellers writes in deeply personal terms about the moments that shaped him, including a deadly law enforcement shooting on protesters at a black college near his hometown which cast a shadow over his childhood. California Coronavirus Updates: Shasta County Moves To More Restrictive Tier As COVID-19 Cases Increase, California Coronavirus Updates: Las Vegas Raiders Fined, Docked A Sixth-Round Draft Pick, There’s Nothing ‘Mysterious’ About California’s Mail-In Voting System, Despite False Facebook Claim, Northern California Wildfires: Where To Find Updates On Air Quality, Evacuations, And Official Information, 7055 Folsom Boulevard I mean, so - and his shoulders, they don't stand as upright as they once did from carrying the burdens of a generation. Come as often as you like — we’re not counting. And if you have that understanding, maybe we can have conversations with empathy, and maybe we can have conversations with compassion, and maybe we can have conversations with humanity and begin to heal the vivid divides that we have in this country. We've been voting. FCC Public Files: KXJZ KKTO KUOP KQNC KXPR KXSR KXJS. We lost our hospital in 2010 because of failure to expand Medicaid. And that's why I tried to make sure that I live with intentionality and purpose - so we can create what you just outlined in your question - a more perfect union. Part memoir, part historical and cultural analysis, My Vanishing Country is an eye-opening journey through the South's past, present, and future. And that's why I continue to work and lift up those voices of the voiceless and continue to lift up the voices of the unheard so that we can actually live in a more perfect union. I mean, it doesn't sound like you have a lot of optimism about the path that we're on. We lost our hospital in 2010 because of failure to expand Medicaid. But as I said earlier, we have made a lot of progress, but we still have so far to go. And so I wrote a book, and I outlined these traumas, and I outlined these stories because I want people to understand the trauma. Protests continue around the country after the death of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis last Monday. And I just was - I was interested in why you wanted to write about this in such a public way, especially because you are a public figure yourself. You probably know attorney Bakari Sellers as a TV news analyst and rising political leader. And then you live in a society where your husband has a felony on his record. You said, it remains the most important day of my life. Highway patrolmen opened fire on civil rights protesters who wanted to desegregate the bowling alley. MARTIN: This happened before you were born, but it left a lasting impact on your life. I say all of that to say that the systemic conditions in this country lead to black folk having these comorbidities and these preventable diseases. And I just was - I was interested in why you wanted to write about this in such a public way, especially because you are a public figure yourself. MARTIN: One of the things, though, that was so remarkable to me about the book is that you write about this in a very frank, raw way. And so I wrote a book, and I outlined these traumas, and I outlined these stories because I want people to understand the trauma. And you have to live like every other black woman in this country, which is deathly afraid that when your son goes out, he may end up like Ahmaud Arbery, or he may end up like George Floyd. I need the other three officers to be arrested in the killing of George Floyd. I got into a very public spat with Jerome Adams, who's our United States surgeon general, because this isn't a question of black folk need to just stop drinking and stop smoking. The water that we're drinking is polluted. This happened in 1968. But as I said earlier, we have made a lot of progress, but we still have so far to go. This happened in Orangeburg, S.C., on the campus of South Carolina State University, which is an historically black university. Your dad was shot and wounded and later served prison time.

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